Location, location, location — you’ve heard it before. Where your home is located is a top priority for many reasons and can directly affect your home’s value, among other factors. So when you’re ready to choose a lot to build your home on, consider the following:

Build to the value of the neighborhood:

It’s never the best idea to be the most expensive home on the block. Sure someone has to be it, but let’s hope the difference in price between your home and your neighbor’s is within a reasonable amount. If you’re ready to upgrade to building your dream home, be sure the neighborhood you choose can support the value of your home.

Don’t forget about schools:

Be sure you’re aware of which school your neighborhood is “assigned” to. Not every town offers open enrollment where you can choose to enroll your kids in a school beyond your designated boundaries. Therefore be sure the school where your lot is located works for you and your kids. No kids at home? Don’t overlook this factor, nonetheless. It could be a make or break decision factor for someone buying your home in the future. Your contractor or realtor will have this information. Likewise you can always contact your school district for a map of the boundaries.

Be aware of future development:

I purchased a model home in a newly developed area back in the late 90s knowing that a major freeway artery was going to be expanded just beyond the development. Enough trees and distance would buffer the neighborhood so we were satisfied with the home purchase. But be aware of what may be built around you. Know what zoning applies to the area surrounding your new neighborhood. You don’t want any surprises when the woods that meet your backyard someday disappear.

The lay of the land:

Fallen in love with a particular lot? Before you sign that purchase agreement be certain the lot can accommodate the size and style of home you’re dreaming of. Some excavating and grooming the dirt can be done, but there is a limit to that. If you’re set on a walkout lower level find a lot that naturally lends itself to that layout. Let your contractor steer you to the correct lot for your home. And don’t forget about Mother Nature, if you love getting the morning sun in your kitchen, your house plan and lot will need to be factored in.

Seek out the professionals:

Rely on your contractor or architect to assist with your lot purchase before you sign the contract. Most would be happy to join you for a on-site visit. They can walk the lot and point out any issues with the property that may affect your project.

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